THE BODY TEMPLE INSTITUTE

OF WHOLISTIC HEALTH AND HERBAL STUDIES

The incidence of roentgenologically visible pineal gland calcification is approximately twice as common in American whites as in blacks, a difference that is very striking after age 40. Comparison of this finding with reports in the literature shows that the incidence of pineal gland calcification is slightly higher in American blacks than in indigenous Africans, probably due to racial mixture among the American blacks we studied.

It appears that the low incidence of calcified pineal shadow already observed in the African has a constitutional basis.

*roentgenologically-the science and use of x rays, especially in the diagnosis and treatment of illness and disease.

 

WHAT IS THE PINEAL GLAND AND WHAT DOES IT DO?

The pineal gland is an endocrine gland, like the pituitary gland, thyroid gland, adrenal gland, and pancreas. Like otherendocrine glands, it secretes a hormone -- in this case melatonin. The pineal gland was the last endocrine gland to have its function unveiled, partially because of its small size, roughly that of a pea, and its structural uniformity.

The pineal gland was called the "third eye" by ancient people. 

Also called the pineal body or epiphysis cerebri, the pineal gland is important to this discussion for two reasons. First, it is the center for the production of the hormone melatonin. Melatonin is implicated in a wide range of human activities. It regulates daily body rhythms, most notably the day/night cycle (circadian rhythms). Melatonin is released in the dark, during sleep. The recent melatonin craze sweeping through the health conscious community makes claims that the hormone slows the aging process (a defense against free radicals), prevents jet lag, is implicated in seasonal affective disorder, coordinates fertility, and allows for deep restful sleep patterns.

Melatonin is a very ancient hormone that is found throughout the animal kingdom. In reptiles and birds the pineal is close to the skin and needs no interaction with the eye to register day/night cycles (this is where the notion of the 'third eye" comes from). In these animals, the pineal gland is the master clock. In mammals, however, the pineal gland is subordinate to the eye/SCN system. Light severely curtails the production of melatonin.

Melatonin has been shown to inhibit the growth and metastasis of some tumors in experimental animals, and may therefore play a role in cancer inhibition. Removal of the pineal gland and/or reduction in melatonin output have been implicated in the increased incidence of breast cancer in laboratory animals. Patients who have breast cancer have lower levels of melatonin in the blood. The hormone has also been shown to be protective against genetic damage, and it has a stimulatory effect on the immune system.

The anticancer role of melatonin in humans is not established yet, but in a study involving blind women, melatonin production was found to be higher at all times. This finding was associated with the finding that breast cancer in this study was correspondingly lower for these blind women compared to the general population.

The pineal gland has been implicated in a number of disorders including cancer, sexual dysfunction, hypertension, epilepsy, and Paget's disease. The pineal gland calcifies with age and melatonin production correspondingly decreases. This decline in melatonin has been suggested to be a trigger for the aging process.

Environmental stresses affect pineal function, impacting overall body alertness, temperature levels, and hormone operation. Stresses that affect pineal function include unusual light and dark rhythms, radiation, magnetic fields, nutritional imbalances, temperature swings, high altitude, and overall daily stress patterns.

REFERENCE:

http://www.wayfinding.net/pineal.htm

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Comment by Mama Mawusi Ashshakir on January 16, 2014 at 12:11am

What is the official name of the TYR gene?

The official name of this gene is “tyrosinase.”

TYR is the gene's official symbol. The TYR gene is also known by other names, listed below.

Read more about gene names and symbols on the About page.

What is the normal function of the TYR gene?

The TYR gene provides instructions for making an enzyme called tyrosinase. This enzyme is located in melanocytes, which are specialized cells that produce a pigment called melanin. Melanin is the substance that gives skin, hair, and eyes their color. Melanin is also found in the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye (the retina), where it plays a role in normal vision.

Tyrosinase is responsible for the first step in melanin production. It converts a protein building block (amino acid) called tyrosine to another compound called dopaquinone. A series of additional chemical reactions convert dopaquinone to melanin in the skin, hair follicles, the colored part of the eye (the iris), and the retina.

How are changes in the TYR gene related to health conditions?

oculocutaneous albinism - caused by mutations in the TYR gene

More than 100 mutations in the TYR gene have been identified in people with oculocutaneous albinism type 1. These mutations disrupt the normal production of melanin, which reduces coloring of the hair, skin, and eyes and causes problems with vision. Most TYR mutations eliminate the activity of tyrosinase, preventing melanocytes from producing any melanin throughout life. These mutations cause a form of oculocutaneous albinism called type 1A (OCA1A). People with this form of albinism have white hair, light-colored eyes, and very pale skin that does not tan. Other mutations in the TYR gene reduce but do not eliminate tyrosinase activity. These mutations, which allow some melanin to be produced, cause oculocutaneous albinism type 1B (OCA1B). People with type 1B are also born with white hair, light-colored eyes, and pale skin, but hair and eye color often darken over time and skin may tan.

Where is the TYR gene located?

Cytogenetic Location: 11q14.3

Molecular Location on chromosome 11: base pairs 88,911,039 to 89,028,926

The TYR gene is located on the long (q) arm of chromosome 11 at position 14.3.

The TYR gene is located on the long (q) arm of chromosome 11 at position 14.3.

More precisely, the TYR gene is located from base pair 88,911,039 to base pair 89,028,926 on chromosome 11.

See How do geneticists indicate the location of a gene? in the Handbook.

Comment by Montu Ra on September 3, 2012 at 2:28pm

Comment by Sista Njideka on July 25, 2012 at 10:13pm

HA HA HA- WHEW!  LOVE THIS SOUL-SISTA'S EXPRESSION!!  She's saying: "Roento..ro..logikal sumthin or anotha...WHATEVA!  I'm 59 years old, gets good sleep and livin my life- CAUSE IT'S GOLDEN!

GOT MELANIN?!!

Comment by Imhotep MAAT RA- HeruKhauti on July 24, 2012 at 4:36pm

Mekyea Wo, The best reason in life. Hotep and Mada ase to Mama Mawusi.

Uhuru!!!!

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