THE BODY TEMPLE INSTITUTE

OF WHOLISTIC HEALTH AND HERBAL STUDIES

 

Mikyia mo (Greetings),

Above are two depictions of the Obosom (Deity) Ausar. Ausar is called Awusi in Akan culture and Obatala (Oosaala) in Yoruba culture.

He is depicted with green skin or black skin. As an Obosom of regeneration, rebirth and renewal (resurrection) He has green skin. As an Obosom of vested Ancestral power and jurisdiction over the Ancestral realm, He has black skin.

We are familiar with green foods being referred to as superfoods. The same is true of black foods. This has always been true in our culture. Different foods of different colors are catalogued according to the energy of the Obosom/Orisha/Vodou (Deity) Who govern them. Such foods are given as offerings to the Obosom/Orisha/Vodou but are also eaten by the community.

Just as we incorporate green foods into our diets, we should also incorporate black foods. While it is a recent trend in 'alternative health' news to talk about black superfoods, this is something that our Nsamanfo (Ancestresses and Ancestors) have been urging us to embrace for decades. Here is a partial list of black foods:

Black sesame seeds: More flavorful and richer in nutrients than their white counterparts, black sesame seeds make an ideal coating on salmon and other fish.

Black beans: These dark, dense beans contain more antioxidants (including anthocyanins) than any other bean. No surprise, white beans contain the least amount. Also look for black lentils and black chickpeas. Add to chili, soups, and salads.

Black rice: This whole-grain rice contains more fiber and nutrients compared to white rice. Some varieties look purple when cooked.

Black quinoa: This ancient grain of the Andes has become a huge trend, but most varieties you can find are white. Check out nutty-flavored black quinoa, which is darkened by anthocyanins. Once cooked, it loses some of its dramatic dark color, but you’ll still reap the nutrition benefits.

Black soybeans: High in protein, fiber and anthocyanins, black soybeans may be better at lowering cholesterol levels than yellow soybeans, according to Japanese researchers.

Black vinegar: Available in Asian markets, this dark vinegar is typically made from brown rice. Similar to balsamic, but the aging gives it a woodsy and smoky flavor.

Blackberries: These deeply hued berries are higher in antioxidants than any other fruit.

Black olives: Packed with “good” fats and vitamin E, naturally black olives get their color from anthocyanins. 

Odwirafo

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I need a LOVE button for this post because I love all of these foods.

As we say the Blacker the berry the sweeter the juice:

"Black quinoa is colored by a class of compounds called anthocyanins which protect the plant against oxidation and UV damage.

Anthocyanins act as powerful antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents that when ingested, protect our bodies against chronic diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and heart disease. Our modern lifestyle has caused many people to become chronically inflamed. Stress, nutritional deficiencies, elevated toxins in our environment, and lack of sufficient antioxidants causes our bodies to produce higher levels of cytokines which cause inflammation and tissue damage. Cancer cells grow and reproduce under inflammatory conditions. Anthocyanins decrease inflammation and cause cancer cells to die (apoptosis).

Not only is black quinoa a rich source of anthocyanins but also are blueberries, black rice, black beans, blackberries, black raspberries, purple broccoli, purple cauliflower, red cabbage, cherries, and many more. Just think black, purple, dark blue, and dark red.

Black Quinoa and Roasted Pumpkin Salad

If black quinoa can't be found try red or white instead. If you don't have any sugar pie pumpkins on hand you can use any winter squash, though butternut is the easiest to peel. When choosing a pie pumpkin look for one with a smooth skin, which will make the peeling go fast. We grew over 20 sugar pie pumpkins in our little front yard garden patch this year...from only two plants! They are sitting in our garage in boxes right now. I've been using them for pies, soup, muffins, and now quinoa salads! Enjoy!

Quinoa:
1 1/2 cups black quinoa
2 3/4 cup water
pinch sea salt

Salad:
one 2-pound sugar pie pumpkin
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1/4 teaspoon Herbamare
1/8 teaspoon cinnamon
1 heaping cup pecans
2 cups diced shallots (or red onions)
1/2 cup dried cranberries
1/2 cup chopped parsley

Dressing:
1/4 cup freshly squeezed orange juice
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons champagne vinegar
1 teaspoon orange zest
1/2 teaspoon Herbamare
 
Rinse the quinoa in a fine mesh strainer and place into a 2-quart pot with the water and sea salt. Bring to a boil, cover, and cook for about 15 to 20 minutes. Remove from heat. Let cool completely in the pan. If you are making this for Thanksgiving, you can make the quinoa 1 to 2 days beforehand and keep it in the fridge until ready to use."  Recipe & info shared from nourishing mealsdotcom

i can never find fresh olives i dont like em in the jar..

Wonderful info!!

@ Doc - thanks ALOT for your info and suggestions MO!

@Lloyd - try whole foods for fresh olives

Meda ase pa ara me nua Odwirafo! Black, Tuntum, Kala is the beginning of All things and your diligent research in this area of our culture has eloquently proved that!

they don't have them.

THE BODY TEMPLE INSTITUTE said:

@ Doc - thanks ALOT for your info and suggestions MO!

@Lloyd - try whole foods for fresh olives

aaah whole foods sucks rocks anyway!! :o) 

In Cincy where I live WF has fresh olives floating in oil - how about a mediteranian store in your area ?

Mikyia wo Kentake,

Yenni aseda...wo ho te sen?

Kentake Malopenza said:

Meda ase pa ara me nua Odwirafo! Black, Tuntum, Kala is the beginning of All things and your diligent research in this area of our culture has eloquently proved that!

Mikyia wo,

Some of these foods might have to be ordered online. I haven't seen black quinoa around here either..

Odwirafo 

THE BODY TEMPLE INSTITUTE said:

aaah whole foods sucks rocks anyway!! :o) 

In Cincy where I live WF has fresh olives floating in oil - how about a mediteranian store in your area ?

Maadwo me nua Odwirafo,

Megye wo so. Me ho yE paa ooo, na wo nso e?



Odwirafo said:

Mikyia wo Kentake,

Yenni aseda...wo ho te sen?

Interestingly enough, i have never seen  black quinoa, black rice or black vinegar before, i never even knew such  things existed! I'm going to make a concise effort to look for these products at the local health food stores and if it is not on the market now i will ask them to order it for me.

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